Somewhere After The Rainbow (Moving Beyond Profile Pics)

After the events of the past week in the US – the marriage equality ruling and the Charleston hate crime – I have been wondering what can *I* personally do to help effect positive change. This is new territory for me. I’m grateful for Pastor John Pavlovitz’s suggestion:

“Laws and amendments and judicial rulings can change policy, but only relationships can alter people. I’m inviting those with rainbow profile photos (and those who echo their sentiments) to engage those of differing opinions, who are willing to have a conversation; not a public, passive-aggressive volleying of Scripture quotes and personal jabs and article shares, but an honest, open, fully vulnerable exchange.

That’s the only way we move forward from here, the only way we can fashion something deeper and more lasting and more worthy of co-owning.”

john pavlovitz

Rainbow Heart

The Supreme Court’s ruling on Marriage finally came down last week—and both Hell and Heaven broke loose, depending on your perspective.

Exhilaration soon followed for those seeing this as a long overdue victory for civil marital equality, while outrage reigned for religious folks believing it to be the final nail in the coffin of Biblical Matrimony.

And there was of course, a flurry of sentiments from both sides on social media; effusive celebration and grief-laden hand wringing flying in as fast as your browser could refresh.

Yet nothing in all of those eloquent words from either side, spoke as clearly and loudly as the brilliant prismatic display of love and affirmation found in the rainbow profile photos now dominating timelines worldwide. That’s been the most visible, most revelatory element of the past week, with over 26 million people already choosing to “Amen” the Supreme Court’s decision using their own images.

Perhaps the most telling aspect, is that these multicolored flags haven’t just been flown by the LGBT…

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The Chokehold of Calendars

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An older Medium post by Mike Monteiro and still a goodie:
https://medium.com/@monteiro/the-chokehold-of-calendars-f70bb9221b36

Why are you letting other people put things on your calendar? The time displayed on your calendar belongs to you, not to them. “I’m adding a meeting” should really be “I’m subtracting an hour from your life.”

I vividly remember the confusion I felt when I was told, “Just add an appointment to someone’s calendar. We all do it here.” This was on Day One or Day Two of my new job. My manager had thoughtfully provided a list of people that I should meet. “How should I initially approach them?” I asked. “Just add yourself to their calendar,” he said. I was horrified. How presumptuous! What a way to make a first impression. “Hi! You don’t know me. And this feels crazy. But here’s my calendar invite!” I think I’d rather show up at their cube singing Call Me Maybe!